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Edible Mushrooms

Don't eat mushrooms you are not absolutely sure are edible!

Here is a list of edible mushrooms. Remember, though mushrooms can be a very pleasant culinary experience or--if misidentified--make you sick or kill you. Make sure you read the guide to pick edible mushrooms if you intend to pick mushrooms to be eaten.

If you do collect fungi for the table, do not eat mushrooms you are not 100% certain of. Use many resources, and be skeptical of your own conclusions. Consider also that many of the edible mushrooms presented here have toxic look-alikes. Please read the disclaimer.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

Clitocybe nuda   (Wood Blewit)
Family
Tricholomataceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 6-12 cm diameter, stem 5-9 cm tall * 1.5-2.5 cm thick
Edibility

Description
Clitocybe nuda, also know as Lepista nuda or Wood Blewit, is a medium-sized, fleshy agaric, with a brownish cap and lilac gills. It grows in trooping groups, often in rings, in leaf litter in deciduous and mixed woodland and under hedgerows during autumn and winter.

Cap violet-brown, emerges dark and bun-shaped, becoming convex and then flattened. Its colour becomes paler from the margin as the cap surface dries. The flesh bluish lilac, thick, firm. Gills liliaceous, attached to the short, stout stem. Spores are pink. Stem coloured as the cap, more or less equal, fibrillose and often slightly thickened at the base. The mushroom has no ring.

Similar species Unrelated poisonous look-alikes include species of Entoloma, Cortinarius and Hebeloma. Cortinarius mushrooms often have the remains of a veil under their caps and a ring-like impression on their stem.

Clitocybe nuda on the First Nature Web site.
Clitocybe nuda on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Clitopilus prunulus   (Dread Dough Clitopilus)
Family
Entolomataceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
2-3 cm diameter * 2-3 cm tall
Edibility

Description
A pale grey-white cap and decurrent, pale pink gills, combined with a strong smell of fresh bread dough, distinguish this species.

Cap white or light gray or yellow, convex to funnel-shaped that may have inrolled margin, sticky when moist. Gills decurrent, spaced together rather closely, and whitish, although they often develop a pinkish hue in age. Stem is central or off-center and is similar in color to the cap.

Similar species Species of Clitocybe and Entoloma can look very similar and are poisonous.

Clitopilus prunulus on the First Nature Web site.
Clitopilus prunulus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Coprinus comatus   (Shaggy-mane Inky Cap)
Family
Coprinaceae
Location
North America, Europe, South America
Dimensions
Cap 5-15 cm tall * variable diameter, stem 10-30 cm tall * 1.5-2.5 cm thick
Edibility

Description
Coprinus comatus, also known as shaggy-mane ink cap, or lawyer's wig is a common fungus that has a white, conical, shaggy cap which blackens and dissolves itself in black, ink-like liquid at maturity. It grows solitary, scattered or in small clusters on soil in short grass.

Cap almost cylindrical and initially covers most of its stem, becomes later conical. It is mostly white with shaggy scales, which are more pale brown at the apex. Gills free, colour change rapidly from white to pink, then to black. It is deliquescent. Spores are black. Stem is white, smooth, often very tall, slightly swollen at the base and sometimes rooting. It has a loose ring that is white, thin and often slipping down stem towards the base. The flesh is white, hollow and fragile and the taste mild.

Coprinus comatus on the First Nature Web site.
Coprinus comatus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Cortinarius caperatus   (Gypsy Mushroom)
Family
Cortinariaceae
Location
North America, Europe, East Asia
Dimensions
Cap 5-12 cm diameter, stem 4-10 cm tall * 1-1.5 cm thick
Edibility

Description
Cortinarius caperatus, also known as Gypsy Mushroom, is egg-shaped on emerging and its cap becomes convex to umbonate with age. It is yellow-brown with a wrinkled surface and remnants of the white to lilac veil in the center. The smooth stem has a narrow, sheathing ring, also known as a partial veil, which is a key identifying feature of the mushroom. The fruit bodies appear in autumn in coniferous and beech woods as well as heathlands in late summer and autumn.

Cap yellow-brown to brownish-ochre, which is covered with whitish fibres. The surface has a wrinkled and furrowed texture. It may have a lilac tinge when young. Initially convex before expanding and flattening with a boss (umbo) in the centre. Gills pallid buff or clay, adnate, crowded. Spores are pale brown. Stem slightly swollen at the base, and is whitish with a whitish ring, which is initially attached to the cap.

Similar species Cortinarius species are related, but have no true stem rings and have rust-brown spores.

Cortinarius caperatus on the www.first-nature.com web site.
Cortinarius caperatus on the MushroomExpert.Com web site.
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Craterellus tubaeformis   (Trumpet Chantarelle)
Family
Cantharellaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 1.5-6 cm dia; stem 3-8 cm tall * 0.4-0.9 cm dia.
Edibility

Description
Craterellus tubaeformis (formerly Cantharellus tubaeformis) is an edible fungus, also known as Yellowfoot, winter mushroom, or Trumpet Chanterelle. It is a small to medium-sized, funnel-shaped, dingy-brown cap that has forked veins instead of gills and a yellowish stem. It grows on moss and found mostly in conifer bogs.

Cap dark grayish brown, convex and sometimes hollow down the middle. The forked veins are widely separated, and of lighter color than the cap. Stem tall, yellowish, somewhat flattened and hollow and often slightly club-shaped or bulbous at the base. Flesh thin and membranous.

Similar species Chrysomphalina chrysophylla, which has gills instead of veins.

Cantharellus tubaeformis on the First Nature Web site.
Craterellus tubaeformis on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Gomphidius glutinosus   (Slimy Spike)
Family
Gomphidiaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 3-5 cm diameter, stem 2.5-4.5 cm tall * 0.4-1 cm thick
Edibility

Description
Gomphidius glutinosus, also known as Slimy Spike, is a grey-brown agaric that is covered in a colourless, slimy veil. The stem has an indistinct ring zone, often stained black by spores, and its base is lemon-yellow. The mushroom is mycorrhizal with spruce.

Cap grey-brown, convex or bun-shaped, becoming expanded and flattened, heavily viscid when damp, becoming shiny when dry. Flesh dirty white, moderate and firm. Gills at first whitish, becoming tinged olivaceous-grey when mature, deeply decurrent, thick. Stem dirty white, more or less equal, lemon yellow at base. Ring white, glutinous, zone-like.

Gomphidius glutinosus on the www.first-nature.com web site.
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Hericium erinaceus   (Lion's mane)
Family
Hericiaceae
Location
North America, Europe and Asia
Dimensions
Body 8–16 cm across, spines 1-5 cm long
Edibility

Description
Hericium erinaceus, also known as Lion's mane, is a large, edible mushroom belonging to the tooth fungus group. It grows on cracks or knotholes of living hardwoods, most often oaks in late summer and fall.

Fruiting body consists of one, often roundish fruitbody with 1-5 cm long, soft spines hanging from a tough, hidden base that is attached to the tree. The spines are white, or in age discoloring brownish to yellowish. Stem very short if present.

Similar species Hericium coralloides is found only on wood of conifers and has coarser branches and longer spines in tufts, not in continous rows along lower surfaces.

Hericium erinaceus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
Hericium erinaceus on the www.first-nature.com web site.
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Hydnum repandum   (Common Hedgehog Tooth)
Family
Hydnaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 3-10 cm diameter; stem 2-6 cm tall * 1.5-3 cm diameter
Edibility

Description
Hydnum repandum, also known as Common Hedgehog Tooth, is a medium-sized to large, fleshy mushroom with pale whitish to pale orange-yellow cap. It grows on soil in broad-leaf or coniferous woods.

Fruiting body orange-, yellow- or tan-coloured, irregular in shape (it may be convex or concave at maturity), with a wavy margin that is rolled inward when young. The cap surface is generally dry and smooth, although mature specimens may show cracking. Viewed from above, the caps of mature specimens resemble somewhat those of chanterelles. The flesh is thick, white, firm, brittle, and bruises yellow to orange-brown. The underside is densely covered with small, slender off-white to pinkish spines measuring 2–7 mm long. These spines sometimes run down at least one side of the stem. Odour not distinctive. Stem Thick, central of off center; colored like cap or lighter.

Similar species Hydnum albidum has a white cap, smaller spores, and occurs on alkaline soil. Closely related Hydnum refescens is smaller and orange.

Hydnum repandum on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
Hydnum repandum on the www.first-nature.com web site.
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WARNING

If you plan to collect fungi to be eaten, misidentified mushrooms can make you sick or kill you. Do not eat mushrooms you are not 100% certain of. Use many resources, and be skeptical of your own conclusions. The site takes no responsibility for damage caused by wrong identifications. If you continue, you agree to view this website under these terms.