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Edible Mushrooms

Don't eat mushrooms you are not absolutely sure are edible!

Here is a list of edible mushrooms. Remember, though mushrooms can be a very pleasant culinary experience or--if misidentified--make you sick or kill you. Make sure you read the guide to pick edible mushrooms if you intend to pick mushrooms to be eaten.

If you do collect fungi for the table, do not eat mushrooms you are not 100% certain of. Use many resources, and be skeptical of your own conclusions. Consider also that many of the edible mushrooms presented here have toxic look-alikes. Please read the disclaimer.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

Sarcodon squamosus   (Scaly Tooth)
Family
Bankeraceae
Location
Europe
Dimensions
Cap 10-25 cm diameter, stem 4-7 cm tall * 2-4 cm thick
Edibility

Description
Sarcodon squamosus, also known as Scaly Tooth, is a large mushroom that has a coarsely scaly, pale brown cap with dark greyish, spiny under-surface. It grows particularly with pines, solitary or in scattered groups, on the soil in coniferous woods.

Fruiting body pale brown, decorated with coarse darker grey scales, erect at the centre, more flattened towards the incurved margin, arranged in concentric rows. It is at first shallowly convex, then flattened or slightly depressed at the centre; at first whitish, becoming grey, remaining pallid at the base, equal or somewhat clavate towards the base, downy. Flesh white, thick in the cap centre, firm, full in the stem. Spines 4 to 10mm long, decurrent, white or pale buff, turning purple-brown with age.

Sarcodon squamosus on the www.first-nature.com web site.
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Suillus americanus   (American slippery Jack)
Family
Boletaceae
Location
North America
Dimensions
Cap 3–10 cm diameter, stem 3–9 cm cm tall * 0.4–1 cm cm diameter
Edibility

Description
Suillus americanus, also known as American slippery Jack, is a small- to medium-sized bolete with a slimy, bright yellow cap. The mushroom grows solitary to clustered on soil in association with pines, particularly eastern white pine.

Cap broadly convex with a small umbo (a central elevation) to flat with age. The margin has a soft cottony, yellowish veil material which leaves brownish patches as it dries. The colour is bright yellow with red or brownish streaks and hairy patches. When the fruit body is young and moist, the surface is slimy. Pores angular (slightly wider than long) and yellow. Spores light brown to brownish orange. Stem cylindric, more and less equal, though, slender, often bent. The colour is yellow and it is often dotted with brown spots.

Suillus americanus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Suillus bovinus   (Cow mushroom)
Family
Boletaceae
Location
Europe, Asia, North America and Australia
Dimensions
Cap 3-10 cm diameter, stem 4-6 cm tall * 0.5-1 cm thick
Edibility

Description
Suillus bovinus, also known as the Cow mushroom, is a small, orange-rusty brown bolete, with a convex to flat cap and short, ringless stem. The mushroom occurs often in large groups beneath pine trees, often beside forest paths, in clearings and at the edges of woods.

Cap grey-yellow or ochre with a pink tinge, initially convex, then flat with a wavy margin. The flesh is spongy and rubbery, whitish, yellowish or clay-coloured and has a fruity smell. Pores generally recurrent, at first pallid olive or buff, becoming more ochraceous with age, angular, compound, unequal, large. Tubes greyish with vinaceous tinge, more or less decurrent. Spores brownish olive. Stem pallid yellowish sienna, more or less equal or tapering at the base. The mushroom has no ring.

Suillus bovinus on the www.first-nature.com web site.
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Suillus grevillei   (Larch Bolete)
Family
Boletaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 3-10 cm diameter, stem 5-7 cm tall * 1.5-2 cm diameter
Edibility

Description
Suillus grevillei, also known as Larch Bolete, is a vividly coloured bolete that is very common in grassland under larch trees. The mushroom is slimy, with a yellow cap, small pores and a whitish ring on the stem.

Cap coloured from citrus yellow to burnt orange, at first hemispherical, then bell-shaped, and finally flattened. It has a sticky skin, short tubes of yellow or brownish which descend down to the bottom of its cylindrical stalk. It is sticky or viscid when damp. The flesh is pallid lemon-yellow, unchanging, moderate, soft. Pores at first pallid lemon-yellow, becoming more ochraceous and tinged rust where bruised, angular, small. Tubes pallid yellow and slightly decurrent. Spores Yellowish brown. Stem cream-coloured turning to reddish-brown with a cream-white ring which is superior and pointing upwards.

Suillus grevillei on the www.first-nature.com web site.
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Suillus luteus   (Slippery Jack Bolete)
Family
Boletaceae
Location
North America, Europe, East Asia
Dimensions
Cap 5-10 cm diameter, stem 5-10 cm tall * 2-3 cm thick
Edibility

Description
Suillus luteus, also known as Slippery Jack Bolete, is a medium to large bolete with a slimy, brown cap and a short to stubby stem which has brown granular dots and a well-developed ring.

Cap chestnut, rusty, olive-brown, or dark brown in color. It has a distinctive conical shape, later flattening out. It is slimy to the touch, bare, smooth, and glossy even when dry, and the cuticle is easily peeled off. Flesh whitish with yellow tinge, unchanging, moderate and soft, unchanging when cut. Pores tiny, circular, initially yellow but turn olive to dark yellow with maturity. Like the skin of the cap, they can be readily peeled away from the flesh. Tubes concolourous with pores, adnate. Spores Ocher-brown. Stem pale yellow and more or less cylindrical but may bear a swollen base. A membranous partial veil initially links the stipe with the edge of the cap. When it ruptures, it forms a membranous, hanging ring with is at first whitish, darkening with age, vinaceous-brown below and large.

Suillus luteus on the Nature First Web site.
Suillus luteus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Suillus variegatus   (Variegated Bolete)
Family
Boletaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 6-13 cm diameter, stem 5-9 cm tall * 1.5-2 cm thick
Edibility

Description
Suillus variegatus, also known as the variegated bolete or velvet bolete is a tall-stemmed and fleshy bolete that rarely exhibits the sliminess that is characteristic of the genus suillus.

Cap sandy to rusty brown coloured. At first ovate and then convex. The skin can be removed. It has a freckly, downy surface in dry weather. Flesh pallid ochraceous and turns blue when cut and thumbed. Pores at first ochraceous with olivaceous tinge, becoming more cinnamon-brown with age, sometimes bluish where bruised. Tubes are dark ochraceous or buff, adnate. Stem smooth and firm. Mottled yellow to a brown-yellow and thicker at the base. The mushroom has no ring.

Similar species Suillus tomentosus is the equivalent species in western North America.

Suillus variegatus on the first-nature.com Web site.
Suillus tomentosus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Tricholoma flavovirens   (Edible Yellow Trich)
Family
Tricholomataceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 5-14 cm diameter, stem 5-10 cm tall * 1.5-2.5 cm diameter
Edibility

Description
Tricholoma flavovirens, also known as Edible Yellow Trich has a medium to large cap that is vivid yellow and brown at center. The gills are yellow.

Cap broadly convex or nearly flat, with an inrolled margin at first; expanding to broadly convex or flat, often with a broad, low, central hump. Pale yellow at first, then greenish-yellow to vivid yellow and usually remaining yellow on margin but gradually becoming brown from disk center outward. Flesh thick, firm; white or tinged with yellow under the cuticle. Gills notched around the apex of the stem, close, broad; edges become ragged with age. Stem more or less equal, or enlarged at base; solid or hollowed in age. Surface smooth to fibrillose; pale to light yellow.

Similar species Be sure to distinguish from Tricholoma sulphureum and from Tricholoma sejunctum, both of which are poisonous.

Tricholoma equestre (Tricholoma flavovirens) on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Xerocomellus chrysenteron   (Red cracking bolete)
Family
Boletaceae
Location
North America and Europe
Dimensions
Cap 4-10 cm diameter, stem 4-10 cm tall * 1-2 cm diameter
Edibility

Description
Xerocomellus chrysenteron, also known as Boletus chrysenteron or Red cracking bolete, is one of the smaller less fleshy boletes. It has a convex, red-brown cap, with skin that tends to crack, revealing a red layer. The mushroom grows with deciduous trees on well-drained, humus-rich soil.

Cap convex, red-brown, often with red edge. The surface is often cracked showing a red underlayer. Pores pale yellow at first, later yellow to olive and stain slightly blue when cut or bruised. Stem bright yellow and the lower part is covered in coral-red fibrils and has a constant elliptical to fusiform diameter throughout its length. The mushroom has no ring.

Similar species Similar species include Hortiboletus rubellus, Xerocomellus dryophilus, and Xerocomellus porosporus which it is easily separated on account of the whitish under layer and truncate (chopped off) spores.

Xerocomellus chrysenteron on the www.first-nature.com web site.
Xerocomellus chrysenteron on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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WARNING

If you plan to collect fungi to be eaten, misidentified mushrooms can make you sick or kill you. Do not eat mushrooms you are not 100% certain of. Use many resources, and be skeptical of your own conclusions. The site takes no responsibility for damage caused by wrong identifications. If you continue, you agree to view this website under these terms.