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Inedible Mushrooms

Here is a list of inedible mushrooms. The mushrooms are not necessary poisonous, but useless as food.

Take in consideration that mushrooms can look different depending on the location and climate. The photos on this page may not be representable for species in your area.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

Coprinopsis variegata   (Scaly Ink Cap)
Family
Psathyrellaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 4-6 cm diameter, stem 8-15 cm tall * 0.8-1.2 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Coprinopsis variegata, also known as Scaly Ink Cap, is a medium-sized agaric with a bell-shaped to flattened cap up to 7.5 cm in diameter, with felt-like, patchy scales. The gills, initially white, turn black in maturity and eventually dissolve into a black "ink". The mushroom grows in clusters or groups on leaf litter or rotted hardwood, although the wood may be buried, giving the appearance of growing in the soil.

Cap thin, grey to greyish-brown, initially oval-shaped then bell-shaped, and then flattened with the margin turned upward. When young, the surface of the cap is covered with a woolly whitish or yellowish veil that breaks up into short-lived flakes or scales. Gills broad, thin, crowded closely together and free from attachment to the stem. They are initially white but turn to dark purplish-brown as the spores mature. Spores dark purplish-brown. Stem thick, hollow, and whitish. It is roughly the same width throughout the length of the stem and may have a wispy, cotton-like ring present near the base.

Coprinopsis variegata on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Coprinus plicatilis   (Umbrella Inky Cap)
Family
Coprinaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 0.8–2 cm; stem 4-8 cm tall * 1-2 mm diameter
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Parasola plicatilis, also known as Parasola plicatilis or Umbrella inky cap is a small parasol-like agaric that can be found in grassy areas, alone, scattered or in small groups. The fruiting bodies grow at night after rain and will self decompose after spore dispersion is achieved.

Cap buff, more cinnamon at the centre and later with grey tinge at the margin. The shape is ovoid at first, becoming convex or bell-shaped, then flat and finally shallowly convex like a parasol. Gills pallid clay, soon grey and finally black; free from the stem; close or nearly distant. Stem white or buff, equal above a slightly swollen base; fragile; hollow; bald or very finely silky. The mushroom has no ring.

Similar species Coprinus auricomus tends to be a bit bigger and has browner cap. A microscope reveals thick-walled brown hairs, confirming it's identity. Other similar species include Coprinus keuhneri, Coprinus leiocephalus and Coprinus nudiceps. They can be distinguished only by carefully measuring the spores.

Parasola plicatilis on the First Nature Web site.
Parasola plicatilis on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Cortinarius alboviolaceus   (Silvery Violet Cort)
Family
Cortinariaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 5-8 cm diameter, stem 5-12 cm tall * 1-2 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Cortinarius alboviolaceus, also called Silvery violet cort, has a convex to an umbonate, fleshy, silvery violet cap. It grows with deciduous trees, but also found with conifers, often on acidic soil.

Cap at first domed and then shallowly convex with a broad umbo, the dry, silky caps vary in colour from almost white through pale lilac to pale mauve. The rather broad, sinuate, notched gills are medium spaced and light grey-blue to cinnamon-brown. Stem The twisted, often club-shaped stem is often bowed rather than straight, is pale and fibrous with a slightly clavate (club-shaped) base and sometimes marked rust-brown around the veil zone by deposited spores.

Similar species Cortinarius malachius has a slightly scaly cap. It is associated with conifers, as are Cortinarius camphoratus and Cortinarius tranganus, which are noted for their penetrating smells; the former reminiscent of half-rotten potatoes, the latter sweet and sticky.

Cortinarius alboviolaceus on the First Nature Web site.
Cortinarius alboviolaceus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Cortinarius armillatus   (Red-banded Cort)
Family
Cortinariaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 4-12 cm diameter, stem 6-12 cm tall * 1-3 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Cortinarius armillatus, commonly known as the Red-banded Cortinarius, is a medium or large, rounded or humped reddish-brown agaric on a thick bulbous stalk with cinnabar red bands. The mushroom grows solitary or clustered on soil in mixed hardwood-conifer forests, especially spruced ones.

Cap bell shaped at first, later flattening out, vividly rust-brown becoming slightly paler with age, with small fibrous scales, often with reddish cortinal remnants forming a belt at margin. Gills dark rust-brown; broad, distant and shallowly sinuate. Spores are rusty brown. Stem is a pallid cap color streaked with fibrils, more or less equal but markedly swollen at base. Ring is made of velar remnants forming one or more orange-red median or inferior ring zones. Flesh is light brown.

Cortinarius armillatus on the First Nature Web site.
Cortinarius armillatus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Cortinarius collinitus
Family
Cortinariaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 6-10 cm diameter, stem 7-12 cm tall, 1-2.5 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
An orange-brown cap, which is convex or has a wavy margin, and a sturdy white stem are good indicators of this species. Both the cap and the white stem are covered in the slimy remains of the veil which is blue-tinged. The mushroom occurs with spruce.

Cap convex to flat in shape, with a sticky, gelatinous surface (in moist conditions). Gills are adnexed, close, and pallid or pale violet in color. Stem solid, equal, and has transverse scaly-looking bands. The spore print, like most Cortiniarius species, is rusty-brown. Edibility is unknown for this species.

Similar species Cortinarius mucosus.

Cortinarius collinitus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Cortinarius croceus   (Saffron Webcap)
Family
Cortinariaceae
Location
Europe
Dimensions
Cap 1.5 - 3 cm diameter; stem 2.5 - 8.5 cm tall x 0.3-0.5 cm diameter
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Cortinarius croceus, also know as Saffron Webcap, is a small agaric with a tawny-brown cap, yellowish tawny gills and slender, yellowish stem with a faint ring zone. It has a mild to radishlike odour and taste. The mushroom grows solitary or in scattered trooping groups on soil in coniferous woods.

Cap at first ochraceous-brown, becoming rust coloured; finely felty convex, often slightly umbonate, finely fibrillose. Flesh chrome-yellow and fairly thin. Gills at first yellow, then tawny and rust at maturity, adnexed, fairly Crowded. Spores rust. Stem longitudinally fibrillose, cylindrical, solid, surface covered with yellow or yellow-brown veil remnants. Ring absent but with faint superior cortinal zone. Flesh chrome-yellow, fibrous, narrowly hollow, stuffed or full.

Cortinarius croceus on the First Nature Web site.
Cortinarius croceus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Cortinarius laniger   (Woolly Webcap)
Family
Cortinariaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 3-8 cm diameter, stem 6-10 cm tall * 1-2 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Cortinarius laniger, also know as Woolly Webcap, is a medium-sized agaric with a bell-shaped reddish-brown cap and rust-brown gills and pale brown belted stem tinged lilac at the apex. It grows solitary or in scattered trooping groups on wet mossy soil in or near upland coniferous woods.

Cap broadly bell-shaped, dry, hygrophanous cap with reddish brown to cinnamon-brown shades and margin with white velar remnants. Gills bright cinnamon-brown as young, becoming rust -brown at maturity, adnate, broad. Stem cylindrical to club-shaped stipe covered with silky fibrils and often with bands, patches, or a ring-like annular zone. Spores rust colored. Taste not distinctive. Odour of radish.

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Cortinarius malicorius
Family
Cortinariaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 1.5-5 cm diameter, stem 2-7 cm tall * 0.6-1.2 cm diameter
Edibility
Inedible

Description
The young gills of this Cortinarius are orange, which helps to separate it from many similar species. Habitat in coniferous woods.

Cap hemispherical then broadly convex; brownish cinnamon, margin more yellow; fibrillose to minutely scaly. Gills Attached to the stem but sometimes pulling away from it in age; close; orange at first, becoming cinnamon to rusty. Stem middle slightly swollen at the base, soon hollow; bright yellow often with reddish area near the base; corona yellow. Flesh yellow. Odor slight. Taste slight.

Cortinarius malicorius on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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WARNING

If you plan to collect fungi to be eaten, misidentified mushrooms can make you sick or kill you. Do not eat mushrooms you are not 100% certain of. Use many resources, and be skeptical of your own conclusions. The site takes no responsibility for damage caused by wrong identifications. If you continue, you agree to view this website under these terms.