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Inedible Mushrooms

Here is a list of inedible mushrooms. The mushrooms are not necessary poisonous, but useless as food.

Take in consideration that mushrooms can look different depending on the location and climate. The photos on this page may not be representable for species in your area.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

Hypholoma marginatum   (Snakeskin Brownie)
Family
Strophariaceae
Location
Europe and North America
Dimensions
Cap 1.5-4 cm diameter; stem 3-7 cm tall x 0.2-0.5 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Hypholoma marginatum, also known as Snakeskin Brownie, is a smallish agaric with a usually tan cap whose colour is very variable and, therefore, cannot be used effectively as an identification feature. That's however hardly a problem because the snakeskin patterning on the stem is so distinctive. It grows in small trooping groups on needles or rotting wood with coniferous trees.

Cap convex, flattening out at maturity but retaining a shallow umbo; inrolled margin of young caps is covered with silky remnants of the partial veil; colour rather variable but most often brick red in the centre and paler towards the margin. Gills at first pallid yellow, then olivaceous-brown, adnate or emarginate, crowded. Spores chocolate-brown. Stem silvery mottled appearance, fibrous; light ochre at apex, darkening progressively to a reddish-brown base; a faint ring zone is usually discernable.

Hypholoma marginatum on the www.first-nature.com web site.
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Lactarius camphoratus   (Curry Milkcap)
Family
Russulaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 2.5-5 cm diameter, stem 3-5 cm tall * 0.4-0.7 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Lactarius camphoratus, also known as Curry Milkcap, is a smallish agaric with dark red-brown cap, pale gills and exudes white milk which savor of curry. It grows with conifers and deciduous trees, favouring acidic, well-drained soil.

Cap dark red-brown with central depression or umbo and a furrowed margin. Gills decurrent, medium-spaced and quite thick. Spores are white to cream colored. Stem is pallid and similarly colored as the cap, more or less equal, and finely downy and becoming hollow. The mushroom has no ring.

Similar species Lactarius rufus and Lactarius helvus have a similar smell.

Lactarius camphoratus on the First Nature Web site.
Lactarius camphoratus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Lactarius lignyotus   (Velvet milkcap)
Family
Russulaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 2-10 cm diameter, stem 4-12 cm tall * 0.8 - 1.5 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Lactarius lignyotus, also known as Velvet milkcap, is a dark brown, velvety Lactarius that grows under conifers and features fairly well-spaced gills, a long stem that is nearly as dark as the cap. It exudes white milk that usually stains the flesh and the gills pinkish.

Cap mid-to dark brown with a velvety surface. As young with an inrolled margin, becoming flat or shallowly depressed, often with a central depression. Gills very slightly decurrent, close or nearly distant; white or whitish, remaining pale until old age when pinkish to orangish hues often result from drying milk and spore maturation. Stem pale brown to almost white with a white base. More or less equal. The mushroom has no ring.

Similar species Lactarius fuliginosus has a light brown stem, and the hat color is dark brown.

Lactarius lignyotus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Lactarius tabidus   (Birch Milkcap)
Family
Russulaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 2-4 cm diameter, stem 3-5 cm tall * 0.4-1 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Lactarius tabidus, also known as Birch Milkcap, is an inedible small agaric with an orange-brown cap, cinnamon gills that exudes white milk. It grows solitary or in scattered groups on soil under broad-leaf trees, favouring birch.

Cap convex, sometimes with a central umbo, that flattens with age. It varies between orange-brown and a dull chestnut in colour, and the surface is dry and matt. The margin often has tiny lobes and can be crimped or crisped. Gills at first ochraceous-buff, becoming cinnamon, adnate or slightly decurrent, narrow and fairly crowded. Spores are cream coloured. Stem colour varies between a reddish-brown and brick coloured, is more or less equal or tapering slightly upwards. The mushroom has no ring.

Similar species other small Lactarius species.

Lactarius tabidus on the www.first-nature.com web site.
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Lactarius turpis   (Ugly Milkcap)
Family
Russulaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 5-15 cm diameter, stem 4-8 cm tall * 1-2.5 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Lactarius turpis, also know as Ugly Milkcap, is a large, dull olive-brown agaric that is typically slimy or sticky and exudes white milk. The appearance is distinctive and the English name is very appropriate. It grows solitary or in scattered groups on soil in damp places under birch.

Cap margin at first involute with a somewhat depressed centre. The upper surface is olive-brown or yellow-green and is often sticky or slimy in the middle. When young it has velvety zones and may be shaggy at the rim. Later it becomes funnel-shaped and the colour darkens to blackish. Gills dirty white, stained olive-brown by old milk. Initially white. They are fairly narrow, crowded and extending downward. Stem similar in colour as the cap, but much lighter.

Lactarius turpis on the www.first-nature.com web site.
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Lactifluus piperatus   (Peppery Milkcap)
Family
Russulaceae
Location
North America and Europe
Dimensions
Cap 6-16 cm diameter, stem 3-7 cm tall * 2 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Lactifluus piperatus, also know as Lactarius piperatus and Peppery Milkcap is a medium-sized agaric with a white cap that bleeds whitish peppery-tasting milk when cut or damaged. The mushroom grows scattered or grouped on soil in deciduous woods from summer and autumn and into early winter.

Cap creamy-white in colour, convex to flat or depressed on disc. Surface smooth or wrinkled in age or where damaged, becoming spotted or smudged with dingy yellow-brown. Gills decurrent, particularly crowded and narrow, white at first, then pale yellowish, often forked one or more times. Stem white in colour, thick and is cylindrical, sometimes tapering towards the base.

Similar species include Lactarius glaucescens, Lactarius vellereus and Lactarius deceptivus that has a cottony inrolled cap margin, and the milk does not change color.

Lactarius piperatus on the First Nature Web site.
Lactarius piperatus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Lycoperdon nigrescens   (Dusky Puffball)
Family
Lycoperdaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
1-4 cm diameter * 1.5-3 cm tall
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Lycoperdon nigrescens, also known as Dusky Puffball, is a rounded fungus, typically with a distinct stem and long dark spines. It is very similar to the Common Puffball, but darker-skinned and with small dark warts that persist longer than those of other frequently-encountered puffballs. The mushroom grows typically grows in troops on acid soil on heaths and in coniferous and mixed woods.

Fruiting body is pallid brown covered with dark brown spines. They are fused in groups at the tips, falling away to reveal a brown papery surface decorated with a faint net pattern. Through a sub-spherical opening through a pore at the apex, the fertile head tapers or pinches down into a distinct, but a very short, sterile, spongy basal region. The spore mass is at first white and firm becoming brown and powdery. Spores are brown.

Lycoperdon nigrescens on the www.first-nature.com web site.
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Megacollybia platyphylla   (Broad-gilled Collybia)
Family
Tricholomataceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 4-12 cm diameter, stem 6-15 cm tall * 1.5-2 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Megacollybia platyphylla, also know as Broad-gilled Collybia, is a medium to large, fleshy agaric that has a pale brown, fibrillose cap, whitish gills and stem. It grows solitarily or in small groups on and near deciduous hardwood trunks, branches or woody debris. Less commonly on conifer timber.

Cap mid- to pale brown, convex to umbonate. It has radiating fibers on dry cap surface. Gills medium-spaced, adnate or notched. Spores are pale cream colored. Stem hollow at center and whitish, with darker fine fibrils that are less dense than on cap. It is more or less equal and thickened at base. It has no ring.

Similar species Pluteus cervinus has free gills and a salmon-pink spore print.

Megacollybia platyphylla on the www.first-nature.com web site.
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WARNING

If you plan to collect fungi to be eaten, misidentified mushrooms can make you sick or kill you. Do not eat mushrooms you are not 100% certain of. Use many resources, and be skeptical of your own conclusions. The site takes no responsibility for damage caused by wrong identifications. If you continue, you agree to view this website under these terms.