MUSHROOM WORLD
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Inedible Mushrooms

Here is a list of inedible mushrooms. The mushrooms are not necessary poisonous, but useless as food.

Take in consideration that mushrooms can look different depending on the location and climate. The photos on this page may not be representable for species in your area.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

Lactifluus piperatus   (Peppery Milkcap)
Family
Russulaceae
Location
North America and Europe
Dimensions
Cap 6-16 cm diameter, stem 3-7 cm tall * 2 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Lactifluus piperatus, also know as Lactarius piperatus and Peppery Milkcap is a medium-sized agaric with a white cap that bleeds whitish peppery-tasting milk when cut or damaged. The mushroom grows scattered or grouped on soil in deciduous woods from summer and autumn and into early winter.

Cap creamy-white in colour, convex to flat or depressed on disc. Surface smooth or wrinkled in age or where damaged, becoming spotted or smudged with dingy yellow-brown. Gills decurrent, particularly crowded and narrow, white at first, then pale yellowish, often forked one or more times. Stem white in colour, thick and is cylindrical, sometimes tapering towards the base.

Similar species include Lactarius glaucescens, Lactarius vellereus and Lactarius deceptivus that has a cottony inrolled cap margin, and the milk does not change color.

Lactarius piperatus on the First Nature Web site.
Lactarius piperatus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Lycoperdon nigrescens   (Dusky Puffball)
Family
Lycoperdaceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
1-4 cm diameter * 1.5-3 cm tall
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Lycoperdon nigrescens, also known as Dusky Puffball, is a rounded fungus, typically with a distinct stem and long dark spines. It is very similar to the Common Puffball, but darker-skinned and with small dark warts that persist longer than those of other frequently-encountered puffballs. The mushroom grows typically grows in troops on acid soil on heaths and in coniferous and mixed woods.

Fruiting body is pallid brown covered with dark brown spines. They are fused in groups at the tips, falling away to reveal a brown papery surface decorated with a faint net pattern. Through a sub-spherical opening through a pore at the apex, the fertile head tapers or pinches down into a distinct, but a very short, sterile, spongy basal region. The spore mass is at first white and firm becoming brown and powdery. Spores are brown.

Lycoperdon nigrescens on the www.first-nature.com web site.
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Megacollybia platyphylla   (Broad-gilled Collybia)
Family
Tricholomataceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 4-12 cm diameter, stem 6-15 cm tall * 1.5-2 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Megacollybia platyphylla, also know as Broad-gilled Collybia, is a medium to large, fleshy agaric that has a pale brown, fibrillose cap, whitish gills and stem. It grows solitarily or in small groups on and near deciduous hardwood trunks, branches or woody debris. Less commonly on conifer timber.

Cap mid- to pale brown, convex to umbonate. It has radiating fibers on dry cap surface. Gills medium-spaced, adnate or notched. Spores are pale cream colored. Stem hollow at center and whitish, with darker fine fibrils that are less dense than on cap. It is more or less equal and thickened at base. It has no ring.

Similar species Pluteus cervinus has free gills and a salmon-pink spore print.

Megacollybia platyphylla on the www.first-nature.com web site.
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Mycena galericulata   (Common Tufted Mycena)
Family
Tricholomataceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 2-8 cm diameter, stem 5-10 cm tall * 0.2-0.4 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Mycena galericulata, also known as Common Tufted Mycena is a small or medium, greyish-brown agaric that has a bell-shaped, radially grooved cap and pinkish gills. It grows in woods on the trunks, stumps and fallen branches of various types of deciduous trees.

Cap roughly conical when young, becomes broadly bell-shaped or with a broad umbo. Margin initially somewhat curved inward, but soon evens out or even becomes uplifted, and often splits radially in age. The Colour is somewhat buff-brown on the margin and fades gradually from pale dirty tan to dirty cinnamon-brown. The flesh is thick in the center of the cap and tapers evenly to the margin, and is watery grey. Gills narrowly attached (adnexed) to broadly attached or sinuate. The gill spacing ranges from close to somewhat distantly spaced, with 26–36 gills reaching the stem. Spores are pale cream-coloured. Stem is similarly coloured as the cap but more pallid near the apex. It is smooth, slender, more or less equal, and somewhat rooting. It has white hair. The mushroom has no ring.

Mycena galericulata on the Firs Nature Web site.
Mycena galericulata on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Mycena laevigata
Family
Tricholomataceae
Location
Europe
Dimensions
Cap 1-2 cm diameter, stem 5-10 cm tall * 0.2-0.3 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Mycena laevigata is a small white agaric that has a convex, radially grooved cap. The mushroom grows in small troops in mixed woods.

Cap white, at first conical, becoming convex to flat or depressed. Flesh white and thin. Gills white, adnate, gill spacing ranges from close to somewhat distantly spaced. Stem is similarly coloured as the cap, smooth, slender. The mushroom has no ring.

Mycena laevigata on the Mykologie.net Web site.
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Otidea onotica   (Lemon-Peel Cup)
Family
Pyronemataceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
4-6 cm diameter * 4-10 cm tall
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Otidea onotica, also known as Lemon-Peel Cup, is a pinkish-yellow, irregular cup formed fungus that grows solitary and in small trooping groups on soil in broad-leaf and mixed woods from spring to early autumn. It tends to grow under beech trees.

Fruiting body lemon-yellow to yellow or rosy orange. The ear-shaped cup is split down one side and has a stemlike, off-white base and wavy margin. The thin, pale flesh may develop rusty spots with age.

Similar species Otidea leporina is found mostly in conifer forests. The dark brown Otidea smithii is common in the Rocky Mountains. Wynnea americana, which grows from a sclerotial mass, is also dark brown but with a reddish inner surface.

Otidea onotica on the First Nature Web site.
Otidea onotica on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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Phallus impudicus   (Common stinkhorn)
Family
Phallaceae
Location
Europe, North America and Asia
Dimensions
Fruiting body 15-20 cm tall * 1.5 - 3 cm diameter
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Phallus impudicus, also know as Common stinkhorn is a large, white, spongy stalk with a dark olive coloured conical head known as the gleba. This material contains the spores and is transported by insects that are attracted by the strong odour. The fungus grows solitary to clustered on soil, often on decaying woody debris or sawdust.

Cap narrowly, bell shaped, with apex open to hollow stem. Surface granular and white under slimy, olive-tinged spore mass. Stem cylindric, tapering upwards from a though, membranous, cup-like volva, which is smooth and wrinkled on outside and white to pinkish or lilac-tinged inside.

Similar species

Phallus impudicus on Wikipedia.
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Phallus rubicundus
Family
Phallaceae
Location
Australia, Asia, Africa
Dimensions
Cap 1-2 cm diameter; stem 3-12 cm tall x 0.5-3 cm diameter
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Phallus rubicundus is a species in the stinkhorn family and has a wide distribution in tropical regions. It has the typical stinkhorn structure consisting of a spongy stalk up to 15 cm tall arising from a gelatinous "egg" up to 3 cm in diameter.

Fruiting body consist of a hollow cylindrical stalk supporting a conical to a bell-shaped cap. The orange to scarlet stalk tapers towards to top and has a pitted surface. The wrinkled cap is scarlet red. It is initially covered with a foetid, slimy greyish-olive gleba.

Similar species Mutinus elegans does not have a clearly separated cap and instead bears its gleba on the apex of its pointed stalk.

Phallus rubicundus on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
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WARNING

If you plan to collect fungi to be eaten, misidentified mushrooms can make you sick or kill you. Never eat a mushroom that you are not 100% sure is edible. Use many resources, and be skeptical of your own conclusions. Please consider that many mushrooms take years of experience to identify reliably.

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