MUSHROOM WORLD
www.mushroom.world
Your resource for fungi information

Inedible Mushrooms

Here is a list of inedible mushrooms. The mushrooms are not necessary poisonous, but useless as food.

Take in consideration that mushrooms can look different depending on the location and climate. The photos on this page may not be representable for species in your area.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

Strobilurus esculentus   (Spruce Cone Cap)
Family
Marasmiaceae
Location
Europe
Dimensions
Cap 1-2 cm diameter, stem 2-7 cm tall * 0.1-0.2 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Strobilurus esculentus, also know as Spruce Cone Cap is a small agaric with a brown, conical cap and whitish gills. The mushroom grows solitary or in small groups, attached to buried or partly buried spruce cones. Note: this species never occurs on pine cones.

Cap brownish grey, convex, becoming flattened, smooth. Flesh white and thin. It can also be off-white or brownish-black. Gills crowded, white, and somewhat sinuate. The spores are white. Stem brownish grey with a pale apex.

Similar species Strobilurus stephanocystis and Strobilurus tenacellus favor pine cones.
Share link

Strobilurus stephanocystis   (Pine Cone Cap)
Family
Marasmiaceae
Location
Europe
Dimensions
Cap 1-2 cm diameter, stem 2-7 cm tall * 0.1-0.2 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Strobilurus stephanocystis, also know as Pine Cone Cap is a small agaric with tawny-brown cap and whitish gills that grows solitary or in small groups, attached to buried or partly buried pine cones.

Cap brown or tawny; at first convex, becoming flattened, smooth. Flesh white and thin. Gills whitish cream, adnexed and crowded. Stem pallid and coloured as cap, finely silky-pruinose, tapering slightly upwards, typically deeply rooting. The mushroom has no ring. Flesh white, fragile and hollow.

Similar species Strobilurus esculentus favor spruce cones.
Share link

Tricholoma focale   (Booted Knight)
Family
Tricholomataceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 5-10 cm diameter, stem 6-8 cm tall * 1-1.5 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Tricholoma focale, also known as Booted Knight, is a medium-sized, fleshy agaric with orange-brown to reddish-brown with cream gills and a distinctively banded stem. The mushroom grows scattered or in small trooping groups on soil with pines in coastal locations.

Cap Orange-brown to reddish-brown, cracking as it ages; convex, developing a flat top, margin inrolled. Gills white, browning on gill edges with age; adnexed to free; moderately distant. Stem white and smooth above shaggy ring, patterned with bands of large brown scales below; tapering continuously towards the base.

Tricholoma focale on the first-nature.com Web site.
Tricholoma focale on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
Share link

Tricholoma saponaceum   (Soapy Trich)
Family
Tricholomataceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 5-10 cm diameter; stem 5-10 cm tall * 1-3 cm diameter
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Tricholoma saponaceum, also known as Soapy Trich, is a medium to large agaric, whose hat is rounded to flattened, often humped. Cap usually tinged with olive; may be brownish on disc center. Gills close. Stalk thick; stains reddish when bruised.

Cap convex, becoming broadly convex or flat, often with a low, broad, rounded hump. The outline typically has irregular lobes or folds and splits. Cap occasionally is off-center of the stem. Colour varies between greyish-green, yellowish-green, grey, blackish, copper coloured, or brownish. Gills white, becoming reddish spotted, emarginate, fairly distant. Stem more or less equal or slightly thicker below, sometimes tapered at base; often bent. Surface smooth to fibrillose or minutely scaly; white of weakly flushed with cap colours, brownish pink at the base.

Tricholoma saponaceum on the https://www.first-nature.com Web site.
Tricholoma saponaceum on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
Share link

Tricholoma sejunctum   (False Edible Trich)
Family
Tricholomataceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 4-10 cm diameter
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Tricholoma sejunctum, also known as False Edible Trich, has a green or brown cap that is domed and flattening with age. Its surface has dark fibrils and is greasy in wet weather. It causes nausea if eaten.

Cap pallid, yellowish or greenish with fine, brownish or tan, radiating fibrils; at first convex, becoming flattened, with broad umbo, slightly sticky. Flesh off-white, tinted yellow under the cap skin. Gills whitish ochre, emarginate, very broad, crowded. Stem coloured as the cap, but more pallid, smooth, more or less equal or tapering upwards. It develops yellow flushes with age. The mushroom has no ring.

Similar species Tricholoma portentosum has darker hat, and Tricholoma arvernense grows in coniferous forest. The poisonous Amanita phalloides is distinguished by it's volva, stem ring, and free gills.

Tricholoma sejunctum on the first-nature.com Web site.
Tricholoma sejunctum on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
Share link

Tricholomopsis decora   (Prunes and Custard)
Family
Tricholomataceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 4-12 cm diameter, stem 3.5-5.5 cm tall * 1-1.5 cm thick
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Tricholomopsis decora, also known as Prunes and Custard, is a medium to large, fleshy agaric, cap with brown fibrils on a predominantly yellow background with brown to blackish scales, thinning towards the margin. The mushroom grows on conifer logs late summer and fall.

Cap golden yellow, covered with fine grey-brown scales thinning towards the margin; at first convex, becoming broadly umbonate. Flesh pallid yellow and thin. Gills egg-yellow, adnexed very broad, crowded. Spores Spore print white. Stem yellow and covered with brownish, fibrillose scales, less densely than on cap, more or less equal. The mushroom has no ring.

Tricholomopsis decora on the first-nature.com Web site.
Tricholomopsis decora on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
Share link

Tricholomopsis rutilans   (Plums and Custard)
Family
Tricholomataceae
Location
North America, Europe
Dimensions
Cap 2-12 cm diameter; stem 3.5-5.5 cm tall * 1-1.5 cm diameter
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Tricholomopsis rutilans, also known as Plums and Custard, is a medium to large, fleshy agaric that has a cap with plum fibrils on custard yellow background and gills are egg-yellow, which makes it easily recognised. It grows solitary or in small caespitose tufts on or close to rotting conifer stumps.

Cap plum-red scaled cap with yellow base colour. At first convex, becoming broadly umbonate. Gills egg -yellow, adnexed, broad, crowded. Stem cylindrical with a red scaly base developing to a yellow colour towards the cap, fibrillose scales, less densely than on cap. Flesh pallid yellow, tough, stuffed or full. Stem cylindrical and with a red scaly base developing to a yellow colour towards the cap. It has no ring or volva.

Tricholomopsis rutilans on the www.first-nature.com Web site.
Tricholomopsis rutilans on the MushroomExpert.Com Web site.
Share link

Turbinellus floccosus   (Scaly Chanterelle)
Family
Gomphaceae
Location
North America, Asia
Dimensions
5-15 cm diameter * 8-15 cm tall
Edibility
Inedible

Description
Turbinellus floccosus, also known as Scaly Chanterelle, has an orange-capped vase- or trumpet-shaped fruiting body. The lower surface, the hymenium, is covered in wrinkles and ridges rather than gills or pores and is pale buff or yellowish to whitish.

Fruiting body initially cylindrical, maturing to trumpet- or vase-shaped. There is no clear demarcation between the cap and stipe. The stripe it is solid in younger specimens, though is often hollowed out by insect larvae in older. At higher elevations, two or three fruit bodies may arise from one stipe. Coloured various shades of reddish- to yellowish-orange, the cap surface is broken into scales, with the spaces between more yellow and the scales themselves more orange. The white flesh is fibrous and thick, though thins with age. Somewhat brittle, it can sometimes turn brown when cut or bruised. Spores are brownish.

Similar species The related Turbinellus kauffmanii is similar-looking but has a pale brown cap. Younger specimens of the latter species also have a pungent smell. Turbinellus fujisanensis, found in Japan, is another lookalike that has smaller spores than Turbinellus floccosus.

Turbinellus floccosus on the MushroomExpert.Com web site.
Share link

« Previous Page 156789 Next Page »





Cookie notice

We use cookies to improve your experience on our site and to show you relevant advertising, as well as to analyze traffic.

Learn more about cookies


WARNING

If you plan to collect fungi to be eaten, misidentified mushrooms can make you sick or kill you. Do not eat mushrooms you are not 100% certain of. Use many resources, and be skeptical of your own conclusions. The site takes no responsibility for damage caused by wrong identifications. If you continue, you agree to view this website under these terms.